Tag Archives: llama

Annie’s Luck

16 Aug

Yesterday when I was doing chores, I went to put more minerals in the pans in the greenhouse and was really surprised to see Annie was in there instead of out in pasture with everyone else.  She looked horribly dumpy and acted really out of it.  She did take off when I checked her eyes.  I followed her into the barnyard, and as she went away from me I noticed she had blood on her back side.  When I got closer and caught her, I saw her vulva was mangled.

I shut her in the Love Shack and called the vet.  After our conversation and getting a bit closer look (so hard to see with a black goat), she also had a couple of wounds on her leg and one on her udder.  It was apparently a coyote attack.

I called my nephew to come hold her while I gave her shots (tetanus, pain killer and antibiotics), and I was shocked to hear a lone coyote just north of my barnyard, yipping with no response.  I would guess this is the one that attacked–in the middle of the afternoon–in the couple of hours she had been out to pasture with the herd before they came back because of sprinkles.

Annie

I don’t know what to do.  We’ve ordered materials to put a fence up to keep them away from the woodlot.  But this coyote was right by the barnyard.  I have five llamas on the farm, but they seem to be rather fat and lazy.

Maybeline

I’m just grateful her injuries aren’t worse.  I will keep her shut in a few days to recover and watch for infections.  My nephew, bless his heart, is coming to help hold her again (I might be repaying his kindness with feta).  Now Caroline just wants to know why she is getting shut in with her mother.

Caroline keeping Annie company

I thought Annie would feel better having her daughter with her.

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Still Busy

3 Aug

I never seem to find enough time to get things done around here.  I just learned the date for the August market that they are doing in State Center.  I’m going to try to get some of the totes made to take and sell.  I’ve gotten a start.

I also decided to put pockets inside some of them.

I have a big stack ready to be turned into totes on my dining room table.

My sister also brought me a couple of new ones–pig and all flock!

I’m still making soaps.  I did another five batches:  Moonlight Pomegranate, Full Moon, Kentish Rain, Fresh Linen, and Fierce.

I still have another nine batches I want to make.  Of course, these will have to cure, so they won’t be ready until the one market in September.

I still have other crafty projects that I wanted to try, but I’m pretty sure they won’t happen this summer.  I have gourds to craft with and llama fleece to do something with.  But there just isn’t time between scooping buildings, regular chores and those extras that seem to be filling my days right now.  I’m still giving Aurora extra feed.

Aurora

Dolly is also getting extra care yet.  Her eyes are still pure white, so I did give her another gram of copper.  I was afraid to wait.  Hopefully, that will start helping her.

Dolly

Just to make it more fun, Dolly busted out (okay, she snuck through the panel where I had to cut Annie out last year) and went to pasture all yesterday.  Poor girl was exhausted when she got back, and the tight, tight skin on her overly full udder had popped–not what she needed.

I have her shut back in now, and I did half milk her out to keep it from rubbing anynmore.  I guess this might start to explain how time goes so quickly.

An Ode to the Wheelbarrow

1 Aug

Aging with aching back
dreading the looming task
I seek help for my work woes
and find a hero in the simple
wheelbarrow–

The task at hand never fun
but progress seen boosts
the spirits; especially now
with my job made easier by a
wheelbarrow–

Now that the garage and buck pen have been scooped out, I’m moving on to the greenhouse.  It’s been way too long.  I figured it up and between the construction mess, rain, dry, llama/cow battles, and not having a manure spreader, it’s been five years since my greenhouse and barn were scooped. [Edit:  I was wrong.  It’s been four years; it just looks like five because the stinking llamas keep making their poop piles in my buildings.] There is no way it can go another year (although, goats don’t make the mess cows do, and the composting actually helps keep them warm in winter).  I picked up the goat minerals from the outside pen and removed my hobbled barrier to keep the llamas out.

I still don’t have a manure spreader parked right outside the pen, so I have to haul it across the barnyard, past the lounging llamas.  Then I have to go in the front door of the barn and out the first side door.

Odie and Maybeline

Then it gets piled behind the Love Shack.  This fall, when the crops are out of the field, it will get spread on it.  If my nephew doesn’t get around to it, well, I’ll have plenty of compost for next year.

I worked hard all yesterday afternoon.  I made some good progress.  This one is going to be a several day job though, because I’m old.  Seriously.  I scoop for four hours and want to take the next day and a half to recover.  I am sadly running out of time, so I don’t get that luxury with this building.

I do have some expert help though.  Tony is trying to make sure I get some good experience steering a full wheelbarrow around large objects.  So helpful!

Tony Llama

The goats had to check things out when they came back up from pasture.

Haley with kids Orpheus and Calliope

Cutie doesn’t look too sure about this.

Cutie (and Aphrodite behind her)

I’ll be really happy to have this building done.  I’m hoping to have it done before the weekend, because our nice, cool working weather is coming to an end.  Then I’ll just have the biggest and messiest building left to scoop–the barn.