Tag Archives: buck

Shipping Fever

26 Jul

I mentioned that Saturday was not really a good day to buy an animal from the sale barn because of the heat and humidity.  I was serious.  By the time we got home, it was obvious that Benji had shipping fever.  Honestly, it’s pneumonia caused by stress, and going through the sale barn in horrid heat is quite stressful.

Benji

I treated him with antibiotics, banamine, and probiotics. I did do a fecal, which came back clean.

He really wants out to join the herd.

This is why it’s always best to isolate a new animal to the farm.  Unfortunately, especially with this heat, I’m not well-equipped to completely isolate him.

Cupid coming to say “hi.”

I did call the vet and he came to check him.  He agreed that Benji is a nice-looking buck, but he’s still really congested.  He added another long-lasting antibiotic and said to do the banamine for another day.

Won’t Benji and 2TC make beautiful babies!

So far, getting him to eat has been the hardest thing.  I think it’s the being penned alone, not feeling well, and the stress of moving to a new place.  The vet did give him some vitamin B to try to stimulate his appetite.  We also talked about the need to continue isolation, but a companion would likely help reduce his stress and encourage him to eat.  After weighing the risks and benefits, I decided to put Gilbert in there with Benji.

Gilbert (not so happy with the move) and Benji

He already seems calmer.  He wants to get to know Gilbert.  And after Gilbert was eating, Benji decided to check it out as well.

Here’s to a soon-to-be healthy Benji.  I am optimistic he’ll fully recover and give me lots of beautiful babies.

New Blood

25 Jul

I’ve been saying for several years that I need new blood for the goat herd, that is I need to buy a new buck.  I put it off when I got the diagnosis of copper deficiency because I wanted to get that under control first. Then there was a pandemic.  After selling Tiger, I hit the point of critical need for new blood.  See every buck I have is an Osboer.  Xerxes is a Fionn baby.  I love Xerxes, but he sometimes gives me tiny kids; he sometimes gives me huge kids.  In Maisie’s case, he gave me the extremes in one birth.  I would like to quit breeding him because of this.  I would sell him, but he’s crazy wild.  I would just have to shoot him to get him off the farm, so  I guess he’s going to stay here and mostly live a contented life (but not get as many girls as he would like).

Xerxes (an old picture because he thought it was too hot for a photo shoot)

Then there’s Freddie.  He is also a Fionn baby, my last Fionn baby.  He is the one I would use for most of my breeding because he should have more consistently sized kids.  He’s more meat goat, and if you want goats to sell well, you want them to be meat goats.  The only problem with him is that he’s solid white.  People want the traditional Boer look.  He will stay for another year though because he’s also my insurance for getting my perfect kid.

Freddie

I also am keeping Frodo for now.  He is going to breed Pretzel to give me the perfect kid.  Then he’ll get sold.  Ideally, his kid will be my next Osboer buck that is my forever buck.

Frodo fighting with Missy

Since I sold Tiger, I need a new buck to breed my Osboer girls.  I have several girls from Fionn.

Venus Osboer with this year’s kids Rajah (on the left) and Abu (on the right)

I decided to go to the sale barn on Saturday to see what prices were like because it’s been a long time since I watched a sale.  It was horribly hot (101°F feels like temperature).  I mean it was hot enough to melt a llama (just ask Maybeline if you don’t believe me).

Maybeline

That is really not the time to bring home an animal because it’s already a horribly stressful thing for them. But, I couldn’t pass up this deal.

Freshly arrived at Eden Hills

He weighed 90 pounds.  I’m guessing he’s about the same age as Freddie (a yearling).  He was clean and moved well and was really calm.   Even when I reached in the pen when we got home, he just looked at me. He was clam all the way until I got in the cage to put a collar and lead on him.

And I dropped the leash and had to catch him again to take it off.

Of course, he was facing a barking dog,

Sky

squawking geese,

nasty gander

sniffing llamas,

Odie

the scent of two other bucks,

Freddie and Xerxes (old picture because it was really hot)

and a completely new place in oppressive heat.  I suppose that would terrify anyone.  I finally got him to the greenhouse, and he’s starting to calm back down.

He won’t take a peanut yet, but we’ll keep working on that.

I even put a tarp up for him to stand outside and get a bit of shade in the afternoon and still be able to catch whatever breeze there might be.

I think he looks pretty sweet.

Benji

Meet Benjamin Butterboer (aka Benji).

Once They Moved

30 Jun

Now that I had the moms where they needed to be, that still left me with a couple of problems.  I needed to get Astra on this side so I could milk her.

Astra (Haley in the back)

It was actually pretty easy to just open the panel by the cattle tank and let her come through.

Three generations: Pretzel, Moira, and Astra

Unfortunately, Astra and Perdita had to be separated again because she thought she should nurse her maa again, and Astra let her.

Astra and Perdita

I put her back on the other side with the rest of the herd.

Perdita, Aurora, and Daisy (I think the kid is Tippy)

Then I wanted to bring Dolly over too.  She’s been getting to come in and eat sweet feed everyday, and I wanted to continue that.  But she and Zinnia were being a bit difficult.

Zinnia and Dolly

Eventually, I got her in too.

I also had to do something with the geese.  The moms and babies can go everywhere, but the dads can’t get back and forth.  I decided I would put them away from the new kids.  I moved pools and so far it’s working out.  I think that’s all the moving around I had to do.  Trust me, that was plenty for this round of moving goats.

two of the babies

Now, I get to continue trying to keep track of kids out on the pasture with all that tall, thick grass.  So far, that has been going well.

Joani (back), Moira and Pretzel

The other problem is that the move did not help with Tiger getting his head stuck.

Tiger the second time I had to cut him out

I actually have had to cut him out of the fence twice.

You’ll notice he has duct tape on his horns, but he managed to rip the horn apparatus off.

I do not know what I’m going to do with this boy until I can get him sold.

I’m going to give the kids two or three weeks to be able to keep up with their moms, and then I can move them onto the Back Forty.