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Draining the Rain

29 Jun

My nephew and I went out to fix the fence that washed out and then we proceeded to get another four inches of pouring rain overnight (the rain I shared with you yesterday).  I waited a day and then went back out to finish the one last bit–I had to add a piece of cattle panel to cover a hole that had been ripped in the wire netting.  Unfortunately, because all the cornstalks and old debris from the field had washed with the last pounding rain, this time, it was silt washing from the fields.  Even in my no-till field, there was quite a bit of silt.

The Ranger made it through, but when I got to where I needed to fix fence, it was quite a little pond.

The tile intake was buried except for that tiny bit sticking out, and it was completely covered in water.

While I looked around to find something to push the silt away from the drain, I heard water running.  I followed the sound, and I found a small hole where the water was going down.  Some poor critter seems to have been flooded out of their home, but it was really helping get the water down to the tile.

I continued scavenging and found an old pole.  It had been used to fasten the gate shut before we put the new gates in, and it was still attached to the woven wire.  Luckily, I had brought bolt cutters to cut my piece of cattle panel, so I cut it from the wire and used it to push the silt away from the intake.  Then we really started draining some water!  Video linked below.

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It doesn’t take long to drain when the water can actually get to the drain.

Just about the time I got done pulling silt away from the intake, a frog jumped over to say “hi.”

I finally had enough water drained to go fix the fence.

arrow pointing to the hole

I just put a chunk of cattle panel behind the hole and wired it in place.

I was still standing in water, but it was already a lot less than when I got there.

Before I opened the drain, that big flat shelf of rich topsoil (not to mention all the yellow intake) had been under water.

I figured I better go check the other two tile intakes in the Back Forty.  The first one was fine.  Again, you can see the ledge of topsoil that was just deposited along the running water.

The last tile intake was open too.  I had to use the pole to move the grass so I could see it though.

Hopefully, we get a break from the rain.  And I think the fence is ready for me to let the animals back out there as soon as the kids can keep up with their moms in pasture.

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Still Raining

28 Jun

I believe in the last two weeks we’ve had about fifteen inches of rain.  We really have gone from one extreme to the other.

Now we really need to get a break from the rain.  There’s mud everywhere!

Hilda outside, (can’t tell which kid) and Odie in the door

The crops are in desperate need of a break.

corn field

Sky wants more time out in the yard to play with his jolly ball.

Sky

It’s hard to enjoy the flowers and pick cherries when it’s constantly raining.

spiderworts

lily

But not back to drought conditions please.

Rain

16 Jun

I have mentioned that we have been dry this spring.  It seems like the rain is all around us, but stops just short of my farm no matter which direction it’s coming from.  Seriously.  My nephew just north of town got four-tenths of an inch one night while, two miles away, I got sprinkles.  That’s been the pattern.  Well that all ended overnight Wednesday and into Thursday morning.  My red-neck rain gauge overflowed.  I had to call my dad and see how much we got–five inches by the end of the rain event.

You know it’s a hard rain when you get the waves of wash coming through the barnyard.

Aurora in the background

After five inches, the barnyard was wet, but not muddy.  We really did need this rain.

Sidney

I decided to go see how much water was in pasture.  The ditch looked more like a real creek.

The debris and flat grass shows how high the water was.  I was impressed.

Then I got to where I was going to take the fallen tree bridge across the water, but it was gone.  You can see where it was supposed to be–there’s no grass.

Seriously.  The water swept it farther down the ditch.  I kept following the ditch to see where it ended up.

It landed against the next batch of willow trees.  Both of the logs crossing were moved from the spot .

To really see how far it was moved, it went the path of the arrow below.  For perspective, the little white spots behind the willow tree are goats.

Water is some powerful force!

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