More of the Aftermath

27 Apr

When I let the goats out on the back half of the Back Forty, I decided I better do a check of the fences.  I mean besides the one that I know was just flattened.

Not worried about this one for now; I just have to have it fixed before our genealogy trip.

I already shared that the neighbor’s farming practices included ripping out the waterways and planting by tilling highly erodable hills which allows everything to just wash.  Luckily they didn’t till under the corn stalks from last fall because that would have made it ten times worse.

The darker lines in the soil outside my pasture are where there used to be waterways. The grass slows the water and stops the cornstalks from slamming into my fences. But they want to plant it and make more money instead of stopping erosion.

Anyhow, not only is the tile intake on the north side of my farm completely covered in their silt, but the one in the middle of the bottom is also completely covered.  There’s supposed to be a burm to help hold the water back but it is completely covered in silt and corn stalks.  Hopefully, when things dry out (after planting), my nephew can bring his new backhoe and help find the intake and repair this damage.

I went back to the fence to check it out, and it looks like there’s a new foot deep gap of lost soil.  I’ll have to fix this, or the goats will be out of my pasture.

They did actually start coming that direction.

But the ground was too soggy, and they decided to go eat elsewhere.  I have a few days to get it fixed.

I did check the intake on the south side of the pasture, and it was still open.  Although, we kind of missed where it needs to be.  The water largely bypasses it and has cut a ditch through that burm.  Erosion is really hard to reduce when you do things correctly, and when the neighbors don’t care, it. makes it even harder.

Anyhow, I’ll get off my high horse about conservation and just enjoy watching happy goats on the pasture.

Penelope and Maisie

Ostara

Victoria

Perdita (still sporting her second horn apparatus)

Until the next time their horrible farming practices totally mess with my pasture.

3 Responses to “More of the Aftermath”

  1. janicead April 27, 2022 at 7:34 pm #
  2. Jeanne April 28, 2022 at 1:31 am #

    I agree with Janice! Sometimes i wonder about people!

  3. Eileen Wise April 28, 2022 at 5:05 am #

    Hello,
    Sounds awful, I hope it is not too difficult to fix your fence and keep your goats safe.

    Take care, enjoy your day!

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