Getting the Hay In

18 Jul

Yesterday morning, my nephew came out and we got ready for the hay to be put in the barn.  He had to remove the round bale feeder (like the big compost pile it left in the middle) because we couldn’t get the hay in otherwise.

Since he had to come do that, he helped me with cleaning the barn out.  The pile he made is on the right side of the picture above.  It’s better in there, but I still have a pile that I will have to finish doing by hand because he couldn’t get it with the tractor.

Then I put the gate across the door to keep the llamas out because I’d had enough llama supervision the day before.

My nephew went out to rake the hay into windrows so it would be ready to bale.

The goats just went about their routine while he raked.

After he had enough done for the small square bales that I wanted, he just left the rake where he finished, and I took him to get the hayracks.

Then my dad came out to drive the tractor and my nephew stacked.  I had the easy job–photograph and bring them water to drink.

After my other nephew got off work, he came out to help stack and continue raking.

My dad left, but we gained my niece-in-law and my nephews’ uncle to help.

Since we weren’t unloading it all in the barn last night, I made sure everything was secure for keeping the goats on the west half of the barnyard.

Lily and LilyAnn

Moose

It looks a bit crowded with them all on that one side, but it was just for the night.

Then I got them their water.

Reva

We unloaded one hayrack before dark.  In the morning, my nephew brought out the borrowed elevator.

We unloaded the other four hayracks.

Now I should be good for the winter.

I better be.  We don’t need another winter like this last one.

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2 Responses to “Getting the Hay In”

  1. Jeanne July 19, 2018 at 12:04 pm #

    I’m with you on that one! You definitely don’t need another winter like this last one – not for a long time!! Enjoyed the pictures. Once when I was a kid, I was put in the top of a stack of chopped hay my dad and uncle were “building.” They had a form around it, of slats held together with wire, which was raised as the stack grew. I was in there to walk around and pack down the hay!! Very messy dirty work!

  2. janicead July 19, 2018 at 2:10 pm #

    My two older sisters did lots of farm work including bucking hay, hoeing and picking cotton. I was several years younger but remember riding to the cotton gin and corn shellers with my folks. By the time I was old / big enough to help with hoeing, picking and haying, Mom and Daddy quit farming. They both took jobs “in town”, Daddy first then Mom.

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