Mowing Rye

30 May

My nephew came today to mow the rye where we will plant pumpkins.  The rye will be left there, and the pumpkins will be planted in those narrow empty rows.

mowing collage

“He just takes the tractor another round”

When you let the rye get this tall, it tends to get tangled in the discbine, but we wanted to make sure it was fully headed out, so it doesn’t grow back.

Discbine_7747ews

“It’s another day in the dusty haze.”

I love this scene.  It means progress towards the pumpkin patch this fall!

Mowing_7783ews

“underneath this Eden Hills sky”

While I was out there, I also noticed how tall the grass is in the buffer strip.

grass collage

“Please don’t let my dreams run dry.”

There’s a lot of clover mixed in.

clover_7781ews

He says, “I never complain. I never ask: “Why?”

And the alfalfa is starting to bloom.

alfalfa collage

“Let my crops and children grow”

It kind of looks like we should be making hay.  There’s always more to do on a farm than there are hours and days to get it done.

Today’s post is brought to you my my hard-working farming nephew, Song-ography, and Jason Aldean’s Amarillo Sky.  I’m also sharing with Mosaic Monday and Ruby Tuesday.

I do hope you’ll consider coming back to join me for Friday’s Hunt this week.  The items for this week’s hunt are listed at the top of my sidebar.

Advertisements

29 Responses to “Mowing Rye”

  1. Margaret Birding For Pleasure May 30, 2016 at 4:52 pm #

    It is marvellous that you have amember of your family who is so hard working and he seems to be doing such a good job.

    • Teresa May 31, 2016 at 11:13 am #

      It is. He’s awesome!

  2. Jeanne May 30, 2016 at 5:18 pm #

    Very interesting view of the day’s work. I’m excited about your upcoming pumpkin patch. I hope it will do really well. The little flowers are pretty.

    • Teresa May 31, 2016 at 11:14 am #

      I do love being out on the farm. Of course, I’m much better at photographing than actually driving a tractor.

  3. peacelovepointers May 30, 2016 at 5:20 pm #

    What kind of pumpkins are you growing?
    Any tips for a first time pumpkin grower?

    • Teresa May 31, 2016 at 11:42 am #

      It’s going to depend on your purpose and soil. I always recommend checking with someone local.

  4. Gemma Wiseman May 30, 2016 at 6:26 pm #

    That looks like quite a heavy task mowing the rye. Your nephew is amazing. And the alfalfa looks very prtty in macro.

    • Teresa May 31, 2016 at 11:43 am #

      I have a wonderful family! The alfalfa really does have pretty flowers.

  5. Judith @ Lavender Cottage May 30, 2016 at 6:37 pm #

    I know from various farmers around us the hard work of this profession and how much one depends on the weather. I’ve also heard you have to love what you’re doing since it’s never going to make you rich. 🙂 Thank heavens for farmers markets and your soap business Teresa.

    • Teresa May 31, 2016 at 11:44 am #

      You really do have to love it! I can’t think of anything I’d rather do than stay home on the farm and work there.

  6. Cloudia May 30, 2016 at 7:03 pm #

    Bless you for farming, and for sharing it with us

    • Teresa May 31, 2016 at 11:44 am #

      Thank you, Cloudia!

  7. Amy May 30, 2016 at 7:16 pm #

    It looks like a big pumpkin patch. Can’t wait to see it progress

    • Teresa May 31, 2016 at 11:44 am #

      It is one acre, which is actually smaller than what we planted last year.

    • Teresa May 31, 2016 at 11:46 am #

      We’re hoping to plant this week, which is always exciting!

  8. Rajesh May 30, 2016 at 9:57 pm #

    Very beautiful flowers.

  9. Tamar May 31, 2016 at 4:18 am #

    Wow look how tall it grows! Gorgeous flowers.

    • Teresa May 31, 2016 at 11:47 am #

      It really does get tall. Usually it’s made into hay before it gets this tall, but we are using it for the ground cover.

  10. Eileen Wise May 31, 2016 at 5:38 am #

    Hello, I am not rushing the time but I can’t wait to see your pumpkin fields. Lovely shots and scenes. Have a happy day and week ahead!

    • Teresa May 31, 2016 at 11:48 am #

      I know. I love fall and pumpkin season! But we’re kidding now, so I am thrilled with this season too.

  11. DrillerAA May 31, 2016 at 7:48 am #

    Few people realize the effort required to bring a crop to harvest, especially when one crop is only there to support the real cash crop. Thanks for sharing a glimpse of life on the farm. Have a blessed day.

    • Teresa May 31, 2016 at 11:48 am #

      It is a lot of work. It’s so worth the lifestyle though. Thank you! Hope you have a great week.

  12. Alica May 31, 2016 at 11:04 am #

    I learned something new today. I thought I knew all about rye…lol…but I didn’t! 🙂 I never knew that if it heads out completely, that it won’t grow back! That will make nice mulch and week control for your pumpkin patch.

    • Alica May 31, 2016 at 11:04 am #

      oops…weed, not week!

    • Teresa May 31, 2016 at 11:49 am #

      That’s what my nephew tells me. Of course, it never gets that far when you want to use it for hay. I think this will be a much better plan than how we did it last year. Guess we all keep learning!

  13. DeniseinVA May 31, 2016 at 1:46 pm #

    It’s lovely looking at these photos. You have a great eye for photography. Each one is a treat to see. I got a small inking of how hard our farmers work when I visited relatives in North Dakota and I got a ride in one of their combine harvesters. I learned a bit about harvesting that day. Visiting over a few days it really made me appreciate them more and opened my eyes also.

    • Teresa May 31, 2016 at 2:13 pm #

      It is a lot of work, and it’s highly technical these days. Thanks so much for visiting.

I love to hear from you, so please leave a comment. If you are having problems leaving a comment Wordpress has made changes to require you to log into your Wordpress or Gravatar account associated with the e-mail address. You can try a different e-mail address, or I have enabled people to leave a comment without an e-mail address. Sorry for any inconvenience because I love hearing from you and want to make it as easy as possible for you to communicate with me.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: