Fields

21 May

While I was out working on fence (still not done) to keep the goats out of the crops, I noticed how clearly the oats stood out from the grass.  Even though I won’t get full hay crops off the buffer strip and waterways this year, I should get enough to get me through the winter.

You can see in both pictures the tall grass is light in color.  This is the remains of the pasture grasses along the fence I am working on repairing.  The oats and alfalfa are darker green.  Then we have the dark Iowa soil of the cornfield.  After this initial year of disking thoroughly, we will no till.  I love looking at other cornfields that have been plowed.  The earth is so dark and rich in Iowa that it makes a great contrast of little green plants coming through the ground.  Unfortunately, it takes extra time and fuel, and the soil erodes.  I prefer no till farming.

While I was out there working on the fence, I thought I should check the cornfield and see if I could find anything sprouting.  I had looked just a couple of day ago, and I couldn’t find anything coming up yet.  Guess what I saw today.  I found one sprouting.

Then I saw another.

Then I looked up and saw a whole row of corn.

I know there is a lot of grass, but remember it was pasture.  It will be sprayed soon to get rid of the grass.  This row looks pretty straight, but in reality the whole field is planted using contour farming.  Instead of straight back and forth, it follows the natural curve of the hills to help prevent erosion.  Norm did say it was one of the more difficult fields to plant because of its odd shape, hills, light poles, etc.

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