Back on the Back

2 Aug

When they were baling hay on the Back Forty, they were careful to close the gates so nobody got on the back side.  Remember, I had everyone shut off because they goats were in the corn field.  I have posts, but I’ve been waiting for the hay to be made before I went out and fixed fence.  Well, when they had to change hay racks, they didn’t see the llamas, so they left the gates open for the few minutes it took to switch racks.  Yep, the llamas came in.

Aurora, Maybeline, and Odie coming through the gates the next day.

We tried getting them out.  But they were having none of it.  And you can’t herd llamas.  Odie just kicked her heels up and laughed at me when I tried herding them out.

Odie

So I did a quick hobble job to hold them out of the corn field for now, and everyone is back on the back half of the Back Forty.

No goats in the corn!

Even Haley made it out there.

Notice how brown it is.  Luckily, we had about two-tenths of an inch of rain right after we finished making the hay, but we are still way too dry.

Pretzel running to get a bottle. Poor girl just had her mid-day bottle cut.

Soon, this back hill will get cut and made into the rest of the hay I need for winter.

Getting the barn filled with hay will make me feel good.

The Dairy Days of Summer

1 Aug

I am still milking my four girls: Astra, Ava, Caroline, and Joy.

Caroline

Now that I’ve finally gotten Perdita to quit nursing her mom, I’m getting right at five quarts of milk per day.

I’m making yogurt and some buttermilk and chèvre. I am making lots of mozzarella cheese for the next year.  I want to make more mozzarella sticks again this year because they were delicious, and they make a nice treat at family get togethers.

heat treating and stretching it

I am also making soap.  It’s been way too long since I made any, but everything is so uncertain since the farmer’s market shut down and then the pandemic stopped me opening my soap room to the public.  I’m not even set up for it anymore.  I still have the bed in there from when I lived in it after the derecho.

oatmeal and honey and plain soaps curing

I’m restocking.  So far I’ve made six batches.  I have a list of fourteen more that I should make.  I’m not sure I actually have enough supplies to make that many, but we’ll see what happens.

Hopefully, I can continue my little soap business, but with rising shipping costs and everything else, I’m not sure.  If you’re interested, you can check out my soaps HERE.

Jasmine Dreams, Kentish Rain, and Lavender

When I get all of the cheese and soaps done, I need to refill my freezer for any bottle kids I might have next year.

Pretzel (every picture of her will be running to see if I have a bottle)

Pretzel has nearly emptied my freezer, and she’s still getting bottles.

The Winter’s Hay

31 Jul

My nephew came and mowed my field on Tuesday.  This is the second cutting off the waterways and buffer strip where there are no animals on it.

We really need to find a time to fertilize it because the goats, making hay off of it, and our drought has really been hard on it.

He didn’t even mow the back hill.

I’m not sure there will be as much as I’d like to have going into the winter, but I do still have a loft full from last year.

Thursday, his dad came out and got it into windrows.

He might have had to wait for the goats to cross the bottom before he could keep going.

Then he baled.

taking it to be put inside for the night

He finished up the last little bit with the round baler before it got dark.

There wasn’t enough to get me what I needed, so he’ll either mow that back hill, or I’ll have to find more hay somewhere else.

The llamas snuck out and were watching him.

I’m pretty tired of this drought.