Hay Is In the Barn

26 Jul

Yesterday we had pretty good weather for baling the hay my nephew had cut on the bottom.

Aurora

It was beautiful hay.  The weather wasn’t horribly hot.  It stayed dry.  I couldn’t have asked for anything better.

After we got the small bales we needed, my nephew brought the round baler and finished the rest of it that way.  The llamas were more than happy to be quality control testers.  Maybeline thought she’d just keep sampling and let Farina and Odie have the spitting fit over the bite of hay they both had claimed.

Farina and Odie in back; Maybelline in front

The goats were more interested in just eating like usual.  They like their green stuff.

Dolly, LilyAnn and Sidney (behind)

This morning, we got the hay all unloaded into the barn before our forecasted rain got here.  Well, so far, we’ve had sprinkles.  I really want it to rain.  That would help my pasture stay green.  That would be a good thing.

I hope you’ll come back to join me for Friday’s Hunt.  I have this week’s items at the top of my side bar.

Making Crias

25 Jul

When I got the new llamas the intention was to hopefully breed them this summer for crias next summer.  The lovely lady I got them from said she’d come help me because I’m certainly not a llama expert, and Ollie was brand new to being a stud.

Farina and Ollie

She came about a little over a week ago, and we caught and prepped Aurora for breeding.  You might have noticed in previous pictures that her tail is wrapped.  That’s because it makes it easier for the guy to get the job done when he doesn’t have to deal with all that wool.  We brought Ollie over, and it was pretty boring.  He just stood there.  He is just two.  Sometimes it takes them longer to figure things out.  We decided to wait a month or so and see if he showed any interest then.

Well, yesterday morning, I went out and found that my gate was open.  After we returned Ollie to the buck pasture, I forgot to fasten it.  All three goats and Ollie were mixed in with the rest of the herd. It didn’t take too much work to get the goats back in, but while  I was shutting a gate, I got stung on the butt by a wasp.

Fionn

I decided to go tend to that.  After all, Ollie had no interest in girls yet, and Maybeline and Odie were less than impressed (yay, I think they are both going to have crias in October).

Maybeline and Ollie

About fifteen minutes later, I came out to take a couple of pictures of the boys just as Aurora and Estarr were coming up from pasture.  Ollie saw the girls and took off running towards them. Estarr started spitting all over, and Aurora ran into the barn with Ollie hot on her heels.  I tried to hurry in, but I had to wait for the thirty goats rushing out before I could do that.  By the time I got there, they were happily making a cria.

Ollie and Aurora (with Farina behind)

Buster might be a wether, but he really thought he should get to join in, so I was stuck there (with my camera) making sure he did not try to help.

Aurora, Ollie and Buster (go away–they don’t need your help)

Some goats were a bit confused.  I have to say, I don’t blame them because the orgling noise the male makes to help cause the female to ovulate is rather odd.

“Why is he growling at you?” –Cinnamon

Anyhow, thirty minutes later, Ollie was finished with Aurora, and I figured I could go put my camera up.  Maybe I’d wrap Farina’s tail, and life would be good.  Ollie had other plans, he moved right on to Farina.  Luckily, by this time, Buster gave up.

I really thought Ollie just needed a power aide and a cigarette, so I finally moved on to mowing the yard.

Then he went for Estarr.  Dude.  Pace yourself.  (He was going to try Maybeline, but she shut him down in a hurry.)

In the evening, I was headed out to the milk room when I saw Odie running from Ollie in pasture.  Typically, a girl will spit and the male llama is supposed to leave her alone.  He apparently didn’t know that.  I will say, Odie would do quite well on the obstacle course.  She had Ollie jumping on her back, but she slipped away and gracefully leaped over a fallen tree while Ollie was like a bull moose in rut coming after her.  I ran and got a halter and went back to catch Ollie.

Odie and Ollie

By this time he had come into the barnyard to check out Estarr again.  I am glad he’s well trained (although he did think about ignoring all that training in favor of hormones) because he was pretty easy to halter and put back with the bucks.

In a couple of weeks, in a more controlled manner, I’ll try to see if Aurora, Farina, and Estarr settled.  This was not the plan.  While I did think, if Ollie showed he had things figured out, I might just put Farina in with him, but it was never intended to have him running amuck with the two girls who are already bred and the wether who wants to help.  Sheesh.

What a difference a couple of weeks can make.

Serendipitous Break Down

24 Jul

Thursday, when it was so hot and I found the chick and I missed the farmer’s market, the day started with my nephew coming to mow the bottom in the Back Forty to make my hay for the winter.  He made one pass by (when I took this picture), and then I never saw him again.  I finally sent him a text and asked if the mower broke down, and, sure enough, the clutch went out and he had to get a part for it.

As we talked, I suggested it was a good thing since we were going to get rain that evening and what he did cut was already nearly dry in the heat, and it would be hurt with rain.  He checked his weather app, which didn’t say rain, and I checked my weather app again.  It still said rain, and mine was correct.  We got a little under an inch of rain that night.

Then we had another half inch the next night.  I am glad that the mower broke.  Today, the rest of the bottom got mowed.

He finished the waterways too.

Round bales on the left are what came off the waterways last time.

You can certainly see the difference from what was mowed today compared to what got rained on.

Hopefully, we get it baled and inside before any more rain comes.

Myson, that’s your winter food. Quit dropping berries on it.

This will be my one cutting for the year.  We need at least four hundred bales.

Don’t eat it all, girls.

That should be enough for me and the two other people that wanted to buy some small grass bales.  I hope.  The dry weather has definitely had an impact.

I hope you’ll come back to join me for Friday’s Hunt.  I have this week’s items at the top of my side bar.